Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen

Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen | Free of grain, gluten, eggs, dairy & refined sugar | www.RaiasRecipes.com
 

Tomorrow night begins the Feast of Purim.

 
Even if you’ve never heard of it, chances are you’ve heard of Queen Esther, the beautiful Jewish girl chosen to be the queen of the Persian empire.
 
As the Bible tells the story in the book of Esther, the king’s right-hand-man, Haman, hated the Jews and tried to have them annihilated. Esther risked her life to plead for her peoples safety. The king listened and allowed the Jews to fight against Haman and his followers. 
 
Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen | Free of grain, gluten, eggs, dairy & refined sugar | www.RaiasRecipes.com
 
The Jews were able to defeat their enemies and Queen Esther has been heralded as a savior of the Jewish people ever since. To celebrate their victory, they hold a feast every year – the Feast of Purim.
 
Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen | Free of grain, gluten, eggs, dairy & refined sugar | www.RaiasRecipes.com
 
Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen | Free of grain, gluten, eggs, dairy & refined sugar | www.RaiasRecipes.com
 
These tasty little cookies are made in the alleged shape of Haman’s hat, and named after him. Filled with jam and made from a tasty grain-free almond dough, I’m willing to eat something named after a villain… 😉
 
Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen | RaiasRecipes.com
Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen | Free of grain, gluten, eggs, dairy & refined sugar | www.RaiasRecipes.com
Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen | Free of grain, gluten, eggs, dairy & refined sugar | www.RaiasRecipes.com
 
Make up a batch and celebrate with a cute 1-year old.
 
Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen | Free of grain, gluten, eggs, dairy & refined sugar | www.RaiasRecipes.com
 
 
Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen
Free of grain, gluten, eggs, dairy & refined sugar.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 c. almonds
  2. 2 t. coconut flour (you can make your own easily)
  3. 1 t. cinnamon
  4. 1/2 t. kosher salt
  5. 1/2 t. baking soda
  6. 1/4 c. honey
  7. 3 T. coconut oil
  8. 1 t. vanilla extract (I like to make my own)
  9. 1/2 c. apricot jam
Instructions
  1. Place almonds and coconut flour in food processor or high-powered blender (I use this one) and pulse until a fine meal is achieved. (Be careful not to puree it into almond butter though!)
  2. Dump into a large bowl and whisk in cinnamon, salt, and soda.
  3. In small saucepan, heat honey and coconut oil until just liquid. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Pour over almond mixture and mix well.
  4. Stick the dough in the fridge for 1/2 hour.
  5. Preheat oven to 350 and line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.
  6. Divide dough in half and roll out between two pieces of parchment paper until about 1/4 inch thick. Using the lid of a regular-size mason jar (or a circular cookie cutter would be great… but I don’t have one), cut dough into circles and transfer carefully to prepared cookie sheets (I used a pancake flipper to transfer them).
  7. Place a teaspoonful of jam in the center of each circle, then carefully fold the dough up to create three sides. Pinch the corners to form a little triangle.
  8. Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until golden. Remove from pan and let cool for at least 5 minutes before devouring. I know it's hard, but you won't regret waiting for them.  :)
Notes
  1. Makes about 2 dozen.
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32 thoughts on “Cinnamon Apricot Hamantaschen

  1. I loooooveeeee Hamantaschen! I usually don't love all the sugar that they are made with though. Honestly, I have never even attempted to make these. Your recipe looks so fantastic – no cups of sugar or anything so I can even share with my son! I can't wait to try making them – I'm pretty sure they are going to be a Purim tradition for us 🙂
    Off to pin!

  2. Thank you Yuliya! These are my first attempt at making them as well. Every year I look at them and think, "I should make these" but I never did. :p They weren't hard, though, and were gone as soon as they came off the pan, so I guess that means they were good. 🙂 I hope your family enjoys them.

  3. I don't have an equivalent, but the measurements between almonds and almond flour usually is not that different. I would use maybe 1/4 c. less – so 1 3/4 c. almond flour, that should work fine. 🙂 Thanks for asking! I hope they turn out for you. 🙂

  4. Thanks for linking this up on From the Farm Blog Hop! This post has been chosen to be featured as my favorite! Be sure to join us on Friday to get your button!

  5. I know the story of Esther, and I've heard of the feast, but didn't know the feast was because of her. Interesting that a dessert has been named after Haman though, lol. They look delicious. Thanks for sharing on Foodie Friday

  6. Glad to share, Adelina! I know, it's funny that the traditional Purim cookie is named after the antagonist! They're pretty tasty, though. 😉 Thanks for stopping by!

  7. What a wonderful educational post, is it a tradition to use apricot, or can you use whatever you want? Thanks for sharing again on Real Food Fridays, new party tonight at 7 central.

  8. Poppy seed is the oldest traditional filling. But you can use whatever jam or preserve you want, and I've seen chocolate and cream cheese filled ones too. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by, Joyce!

  9. I never knew the story of Hamantaschen, so thanks for sharing! Thanks also for stopping by Five Friday Finds last week. Hope you can make it again this week. 🙂

  10. In addition to gluten, dairy and egg, I am also allergic to almonds. A lot of your recipes use almonds, so I wonder if you know what would work best as a replacement for almond flour.

    1. Hi Nancy! Of course you can use something else instead of the almonds. I’ve not tried it on this recipe, but you could replace the 2 cups of almond flour with 2 cups of any gluten-free flour blend. I try to stay away from using almonds in too many of my recipes, I don’t think loads of them are healthy even for people who aren’t allergic to them!

      Hope these turn out well for you!

  11. Raia:
    These look do-able too! Can you please confirm that the “2t. coconut flour” is correct (I am wondering if it’s really “2t.” teaspoons???
    Also, if I wanted to substitute another sweetener such as coconut sugar or stevia, how much do you think I should put in?
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP!

    1. Yes, I just use a couple teaspoons of the coconut flour. 🙂 As for the sweetener, I have not ever tried the recipe with a granulated sweetener, so I couldn’t say if it would work properly. I would stick with honey, maple syrup, or agave (though I personally don’t like agave). If you’re going to try granulated, though, I would only use about 2 tablespoons. The dough is not super sweet, the sweetness comes from the filling.

      Hope you like the cookies!

    1. 🙂 They’re pretty delicious, even if they are a little harder to make than regular ones. It’s worth it. 😉